DCD London: Intel’s DCIM architect says standards key for future management

Says Data Center Manager’s take up will be driven by the consumer’s need to manage sprawl and the need need to reduce overall power use

30 November 2011 by Penny Jones - DatacenterDynamics

 

The consumer and Intel will be the driving forces behind the standardization of tools used for Data Center Infrastructure Management, according to Intel Chief Architect of its Data Center Manager Dror Shenkar.

Speaking at DatacenterDynamics’ London event today, Israel-based Shenkar said that tools such as Data Center Manager – software that can sit on the chip in servers featuring Intel technology – will be required by the consumer in future as they battle with the management of growing server sprawl within the data center.

He said that unlike traditional DCIM offerings, which often work on a proprietary basis, Intel will be working with DCIM vendors for the distribution of its Data Center Manager technology which it says can measure monitor data center activity right down the server level.

“We try to simplify the work for the DCIM vendors themselves. We are providing them a middleware they can integrate in their solution. Our expertise is to collect granular power data from the servers and provide this to the DCIM vendors,” Shenkar said.

“Obviously we (Intel) have better ways to interface between [the technology]. We are the layer between the software and hardware itself so we know how to talk to the servers themselves much better than other players today can.”

But Shenkar said while Intel’s technology can deliver granulated detail on the data center, a battle needs to be played out between consumers and hardware vendors before such technology is commonplace in the data center.

“I think it is a typical battle. Sometimes vendors want things a bit more in control and they want to protect their proprietary technology but at some point we will see more and more pressure from consumers, and we will see hardware vendors will agree to standards,” Shenkar.

Such a shift will make technology such as Intel’s, which can be integrated into so many product stacks, beneficial in the data center.

Shenkar said more data center operators are starting to realize that power needs to be monitored in every level of the stack, not only to bring about cost reductions but to improve availability in the data center.

He said figures provided by ASE/1E Survey showed that an estimated 10 to 15% of servers in the data center are still essentially ghost servers and that data by McKinsey shows that US$24.7bn is wasted in server management and cooling costs each year in terms of managing these servers.

He said in future though, new standards such as Energy Star will ensure servers are doing much more to save power, and work more efficiently.

“If you look at devices from the last three to four years, most have the capability to tell you how much power they consume,” Shenkar said.

“Not saying we are using everything, but the device itself has the capacity to tell you how much power it consumes, and some devices you can even tell them how much to consume so you can cap the power consumption.

“I think we will see this trend even more. If we look at the Energy Star specifications, the next version will force OEMs that have the Energy Star stamp to provide a way to monitor power on their devices.

Stay up to date with the latest news from DatacenterDynamics CONVERGED which started in London today at #DCDLondonThe consumer and Intel will be the driving forces behind the standardization of tools used for Data Center Infrastructure Management, according to Intel Chief Architect of its Data Center Manager Dror Shenkar.

Speaking at DatacenterDynamics’ London event today, Israel-based Shenkar said that tools such as Data Center Manager – software that can sit on the chip in servers featuring Intel technology – will be required by the consumer in future as they battle with the management of growing server sprawl within the data center.

He said that unlike traditional DCIM offerings, which often work on a proprietary basis, Intel will be working with DCIM vendors for the distribution of its Data Center Manager technology which it says can measure monitor data center activity right down the server level.

“We try to simplify the work for the DCIM vendors themselves. We are providing them a middleware they can integrate in their solution. Our expertise is to collect granular power data from the servers and provide this to the DCIM vendors,” Shenkar said.

“Obviously we (Intel) have better ways to interface between [the technology]. We are the layer between the software and hardware itself so we know how to talk to the servers themselves much better than other players today can.”

But Shenkar said while Intel’s technology can deliver granulated detail on the data center, a battle needs to be played out between consumers and hardware vendors before such technology is commonplace in the data center.

“I think it is a typical battle. Sometimes vendors want things a bit more in control and they want to protect their proprietary technology but at some point we will see more and more pressure from consumers, and we will see hardware vendors will agree to standards,” Shenkar.

Such a shift will make technology such as Intel’s, which can be integrated into so many product stacks, beneficial in the data center.

Shenkar said more data center operators are starting to realize that power needs to be monitored in every level of the stack, not only to bring about cost reductions but to improve availability in the data center.

He said figures provided by ASE/1E Survey showed that an estimated 10 to 15% of servers in the data center are still essentially ghost servers and that data by McKinsey shows that US$24.7bn is wasted in server management and cooling costs each year in terms of managing these servers.

He said in future though, new standards such as Energy Star will ensure servers are doing much more to save power, and work more efficiently.

“If you look at devices from the last three to four years, most have the capability to tell you how much power they consume,” Shenkar said.

“Not saying we are using everything, but the device itself has the capacity to tell you how much power it consumes, and some devices you can even tell them how much to consume so you can cap the power consumption.

“I think we will see this trend even more. If we look at the Energy Star specifications, the next version will force OEMs that have the Energy Star stamp to provide a way to monitor power on their devices.

Stay up to date with the latest news from DatacenterDynamics CONVERGED which started in London today at #DCDLondon

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